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UK: Assange supporters worried for his health after seeing him in courtroom

0 21.10.2019 Инфо

M/S Westminster Magistrates Court entrance, London
SOT, Isabell, protester: "When there was this other hearing on the 11th of October, I got the message that the judge decided Assange has to appear in person at the next hearing. So, I felt like I really have to be here. So, in the case that I get into the courtroom, that Assange sees as many supporters as he can. So, there were like 41 seats, we were, like, raising our fists when we saw him. It was like he clearly had tears in his eyes. It was really an emotional moment. I'm coming to London since August. So on the 24th it was the first time that I was at a rally in front of Stratford [Station]. So, since that time I'm always coming again from Germany to protest here."
M/S Police outside the court
SOT, Joe, protester: "Well, they took Julian out of Belmarsh and his isolation. The judge Baraitser refused to consider his conditions under which he's being held, and his right as a remand prisoner are being ignored and overruled. And, they are thinking of moving the main trial in February to Belmarsh court, which only has five seats for the public. Today, as far as I know, eight journalists were turned away from the press bench, as it were, and there were insufficient public seats as well. Obviously, it's another case in a very very very long and drawn out extradition process and they don't mind if it takes another 10 years as long as he's in prison."
M/S "Free Julian Assange" t-shirt
SOT, Aimee, protester: "We gathered here today in support of Julian Assange, the publisher of WikiLeaks; we're extremely concerned about his health at the moment. And, his conditions of remand in Belmarsh prison is totally unacceptable. A publisher, in the twenty first century in this country, where he has to endure, what he has endured over almost a decade. We saw him today; the judge asked him whether he understood what was happening; it was a case management hearing for his preparation for the US extradition hearing in February. The judge asked him: "Did you understand?" and he said, "No, not really." And then he explained how difficult it is because of his conditions in Belmarsh to stay in touch with the developments in his case. He explained how difficult it was to communicate with his lawyers. And the reply from the judge was: "The conditions of your stay in Belmarsh is not the object of this court." So, completely dismissed. She wasn't interested in what he had to say. It's a shocking situation. He should be freed. We come here to complain for his release. He should be freed. No journalist should be exposed to the risk of extradition to US or any country around the world based on what they publish."
W/S Protesters outside court, London
SCRIPT
Supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange voiced their concerns about his health, as some of them managed to see him in the courtroom of Westminster Magistrates' Court in London, where he was taken for a case management hearing, on Monday.
"There were like 41 seats, we were, like, raising our fists when we saw him. It was like he clearly had tears in his eyes. It was really an emotional moment," said Isabell, an Assange supporter from Germany.
"We're extremely concerned about his health at the moment. And, his conditions of remand in Belmarsh prison is totally unacceptable. A publisher, in the twenty first century in this country, where he has to endure, what he has endured over almost a decade," said Aimee.
"He explained how difficult it is because of his conditions in Belmarsh to stay in touch with the developments in his case. He explained how difficult it was to communicate with his lawyers. And the reply from the judge was: "The conditions of your stay in Belmarsh is not the object of this court." So, completely dismissed. She wasn't interested in what he had to say. It's a shocking situation," she added.
The WikiLeaks founder was due to appear in court for an extradition hearing. He is charged with computer-hacking and violating US espionage law.
Assange completed his sentence for skipping bail on September 22, but remained in jail as a judge believed he could flee before his US extradition hearing.
He is facing the extradition request on espionage charges related to the publication of classified military and diplomatic documents in 2010.