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Poland: Hitler’s Wolf’s Lair bunker gets makeover to attract more visitors

1 14.11.2019 Инфо

W/S Wolf's Lair complex in Gierloz
M/S Inside one part of Wolf's Lair
M/S Destroyed parts
M/S Destroyed parts
M/S Destroyed parts
M/S Inside the complex
W/S Wolf's Lair complex
M/S No entry sign
M/S Constructions
M/S Constructions
SOT, Zenon Piotrowicz, Wolf's Lair managing director (Polish): "We divided the Wolf's Lair object into two functional zones. The first is the one we are in now. The zone of ruins, a museum zone will be preserved untouched, except for a small element. Behind me you can see works that are ongoing, but they only concern the sightseeing route, alleys. However, we plan larger works in this zone where we welcome tourists, where we have to secure the standard of sightseeing. We are talking about a parking lot and an entrance, a hotel, a restaurant. For sure, we will not rebuild any bunkers in the museum zone."
C/U Sign saying (German): "Mines"
W/S Mine field
SOT, Mangalena Gradowska, tourist (Polish): "Memorial site? It sounds as if we would like to worship Hitler here, but I think it should stay as it is, to show history and just stay the way it is."
W/S Wolf's Lair complex
SOT, Domink Sliwinski, tourist (Polish): "I don't think this place attracts Hitler's supporters, because if it did they would gather anywhere. I doubt they would do so in such an obvious place. Simply this place has a historical memory, and it's not to praise such a war criminal."
C/U Miniature design of project
C/U Miniature design of project
SCRIPT
Hidden deep inside the forests of eastern Poland lie the remains of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler's eastern headquarters, the Wolf's Lair bunker.
The Nazi complex was abandoned in 1944 following Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg's assassination attempt on Hitler, and hasn't undergone any renovations since.
However, in a bid to draw in more visitors and revenue, Polish state's Srokowo Forest District, which oversees the site, has recently started restoring the complex.
There have been growing fears in Poland that the renovation of the complex might attract neo-Nazis to the place.
Wolf's Lair's managing director Zenon Piotrowicz explained that the rebuilding plans did not include the bunkers.
"We are talking about a parking lot and an entrance, a hotel, a restaurant. For sure, we will not rebuild any bunkers in the museum zone," he said.
"Memorial site? It sounds as if we would like to worship Hitler here, but I think it should stay as it is, to show history and just stay the way it is," said one tourist, Magdalena Gradowska.
Another visitor, Domink Sliwinski, was also sceptical about the complex attracting Hitler's followers.
"If it did they would gather anywhere. I doubt they would do so in such an obvious place," he said.
The remote site has been open for audience since the beginning of 1990s after the fall of communism, and attracts around 300,000 visitors annually.