Bolivia: Capybaras take over golf club deserted amid coronavirus outbreak

M/S Capybaras at Urubo Golf Country Club in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Santa Cruz
M/S Capybara eating, baby capybara in background
W/S Capybara inside lagoon
W/S Capybaras inside lagoon
M/S Capybara diving
W/S Lagoon with capybaras and seaweed
M/S Capybara swimming
M/S Lagoon with capybaras and seaweed
M/S Lagoon with capybaras and seaweed
M/S Capybara on grass
W/S Capybaras moving, golf club construction site in distance
W/S Capybaras, car and golf club vehicle in distance
W/S Capybaras swimming in lagoon
W/S Capybaras swimming in lagoon
W/S Capybaras swimming in lagoon
M/S Capybaras swimming
W/S Capybaras eating on grass
M/S Capybara moving in grass
M/S Capybaras on alert
W/S Capybaras eating
W/S Laguna and golf club maintenance deposit
SOT, Marco Antonio Antelo, Logistics area worker for the Urubo Golf Country Club (Spanish): "Once the quarantine began, the capybaras started to come out more. Today they are in a herd, they are many more than those seen before. This phenomenon has not happened before at the Golf Club."
W/S Golf club lagoon *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Marco Antonio Antelo, Logistics area worker for the Urubo Golf Country Club (Spanish): "Now as you can see there are about 30 to 40 capybaras, before it was possible to see only 4 or 5, many more capybaras have come out in big numbers."
W/S Letters with golf club name *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Marco Antonio Antelo, Logistics area worker for the Urubo Golf Country Club (Spanish): "It is because people are not coming to play at the golf club, nor do they go out for a walk as this golf club is a busy place."
W/S Sunset at Urubo Golf Country Club in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Santa Cruz
SCRIPT
At the Urubo Golf Country Club in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, world's friendliest rodents capybaras have been spotted more frequently in recent days as the club has not been frequented often due to the coronavirus outbreak, as footage filmed on Saturday shows.
Dozens of rodents could be seen moving in herds and swimming in the lagoon of the exclusive resort now deserted.
As a local worker explained, up to 40 capybaras took over the grounds of the golf club since the quarantine started.
The mammals, which are usually seen in smaller numbers in the area, are known as the largest rodent in the world and are a native species of Bolivia.
The country, whose government declared a quarantine on March 21, recorded 139 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 10 deaths as of Saturday.

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