VBox7 logo

Germany: 'This is still the calm before the storm'- Health Min Spahn on coronavirus

W/S German Health Minister Jens Spahn arriving at government press conference, Berlin
M/S Spahn standing at conference
M/S Journalists *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "We already have many infected people in Germany and we also mourn many deceased. But so far, this is still the calm before the storm. No one can say for sure, what will happen in the next weeks.''
C/U Camera *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "​I sense in many talks and also the [German] states are very active here, all 16 federal states, we discuss this too during our daily live connection, that the effort to double the intensive care capacities in Germany is very, very high, that many houses, many states conceptually work on this and much strength, time and resources are invested here.''
C/U Journalist typing *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "Another strength and another buying of time we achieve through the high amount of tests. It was already said today at a different place. We have had between 300,000 and 500,000 tests last week in Germany. This is most likely the highest amount of tests of a country worldwide, in absolute and relative numbers.''
C/U Cameras *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "This shows the strength of our health system, also in this important question. But it also makes it possible for us to prepare earlier than it was possible for other countries.''
M/S Journalists *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "Mrs. Braun, I would say both is correct. Many and purposeful is our goal. We want to test many and we want to test more purposeful.''
C/U Camera *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "You are right, the positive tests have been here about 10 percent on average and that is an indicator, that a more targeted [testing] is possible. And that is exactly the reason why the criteria has been revised in the last days.''
M/S Journalist *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "I could have never imagined, that in an area where it was once about cents - you need to see, those masks have once cost six cents, others 17 cents - that we come into a situation worldwide, where we talk about three, five, six Euros for FFP2 masks, the ones that protect better, especially for the tests. This is a highly competitive market at the moment. The prices rise and fall like at the gold market or however you want to compare it. And this is very challenging, but we are optimistic that we bring things step by step in a better direction with other approaches and new partners.''
C/U Camera *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Jens Spahn, German Health Minister (German): "​At the same time to see, what kind of laboratory capacity we have in this country - like no other country in the world - intensive care capacities, experts, doctors, caretakers in an amount and with a motivation that not many other countries have. Sometimes I plead with the Germans to see, if it already gets difficult for us on some levels, keep a feeling on how difficult it can probably become for other countries in this situation, with this epidemic. I think, that is very important, because it lets you stay humble, to see this despite all the problems we have in Germany.''
M/S Journalist *CUTAWAY*
SOT, Susanne Herold, Head of Infectiology department at University Hospital of Giessen (German): "Maybe compared to Italy - we just heard how the capacities of our available intensive care beds are for this illness. These are already more available than are available in all of Italy. I think we are very well prepared. We were lucky enough, that we had a very long period of preparation and were able to set everything in motion, training people with ventilators, ordering new equipment and really add equipment, planning decidedly, which will work and not to have to act in a short time. That is why I think with this advantage and our wide range of testing possibilities, we have a much better standing than countries, where it has gone badly. When we look to New York City, for example, or as you said Italy, I believe we are well positioned. I have a good feeling, that we can stem this.''
W/S Federal government press conference
M/S Spahn leaving federal government press conference
W/S End of conference
SCRIPT
The current situation with the coronavirus in Germany is "still the calm before the storm," warned German Health Minister Jens Spahn at a government press conference in Berlin on Thursday.
Spahn commented on the big "effort to double the intensive care capacities in Germany" by the 16 federal states, adding that "No one can say for sure what will happen in the next weeks."
The health minister also commented on Germany's position relative to other countries saying that the country carried out "between 300,000 and 500,000 tests," which he added was "most likely the highest amount of tests of a country worldwide.''
Spahn also compared the fluctuating price of much needed masks to the gold market, as he explained "it's a highly competitive market at the moment," but said that the government is "optimistic that we bring things step by step in a better direction with other approaches and new partners."
Spahn was joined by Professor Doctor Susanne Herold, Head of the Infectiology department of the University Hospital in Giessen. "We were lucky enough, that we had a very long period of preparation and were able to set everything in motion," she pointed out.
According to the latest figures compiled from global reports by Johns Hopkins University, at least 510,100 people have been infected by COVID-19 worldwide and over 22,200 people have died. There are 41,3159 cases confirmed in Germany with at least 239 fatalities as of Thursday.