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Germany: Twelve million yr/old upright walking hominids discovered in Allgaeu

0 12.11.2019 Инфо

C/U Skull reconstruction of 12 million year old hominidae Danuvius guggenmosi, Tuebingen
M/S University of Tuebingen Professor of Palaeoclimatology Madelaine Boehme
C/U Jaw
M/S Reconstructed skull
M/S Boehme explaining skull markers
SOT, Madelaine Boehme, Professor of Palaeoclimatology (German): "Since 2011 we are digging in Allgau, we have rich finding sites that deliver fossils from between ten and 12 million years ago. The most exceptional fossils, the most interesting ones, are hominids. We found these hominids between 2015 and 2018, overall 37 individual pieces. The interesting thing is that they spread over four individuals. We have a male individual, two female and a young animal. Furthermore, the finding of hominids is a little sensation in itself in Germany. More important is that we can state a lot about the biology and the way hominids lived with these relatively complete, or extensive, findings. What surprised us all a lot, me included, was that these forms, these hominids, we call them 'Danuvius', have more similarities to humans in many skeletal parts than contemporary hominids have."
M/S Findings
SOT, Madelaine Boehme, Professor of Palaeoclimatology (German): "There are multiple finding sites, they are clay pits. One clay pit in particular, where we also found Danuvius, is an active clay mining site which means that when it rains it is muddy and you should not go in. When it is dry it is dusty and you should not go in anyway because it is an active mining site. But we have been digging there for many years with special methods, techniques so that we can dig in bad weather situations as well."
C/U Danuvius guggenmosi teeth fractions
SOT, Madelaine Boehme, Professor of Palaeoclimatology (German): "We took over a lot from archaeologists' techniques and used them on our concerns. This means we mostly have 'dig tents', we work in different squares. You have to imagine it like a sort of meditation because you deal with a rock stratum, relatively long, for hours on end and you have to uncover the rock centimeter by centimeter to see if there are any bones."
M/S Findings
SOT, Madelaine Boehme, Professor of Palaeoclimatology (German): "What we see is our male individual, we call him 'Udo', he consists of 21 original bones that we have and then you can see that we reconstructed missing bones. This means that if we have a part of the right arm, we scanned it with a scanner, mirrored it and printed it so that it is easier to imagine how the body proportions were. Danuvius is a hominidae that walked on two legs, albeit not on the ground but in trees. He was about one metre tall, maybe one metre and five centimetres, around there, weighed around 30 kilograms. He was very similar to today's bonobo, which means the arms were a lot longer than ours. What is similar to us humans is that he had a permanently stretched posture."
C/U Reconstructed skull
SOT, Madelaine Bohme, Professor of Palaeoclimatology (German): "This means he had an adaptation on his feet which we call 'cross feet' which means he could move his big toe. So if this would be the foot he could set his big toe against and have a very, very tight grip on branches."
M/S Boehme putting on gloves
M/S Boehme
C/U Boehme picking up teeth fragment
M/S Boehme explaining
C/U Fragment
M/S Boehme explaining
C/U Boehme picking up teeth fragment
M/S Findings
C/U Hominidae sign
M/S University of Tuebingen sign
M/S University's geological institute building
SCRIPT
German scientists have made a discovery of 12 million year old Hominidae skeleton fragments in Germany's Allgaeu region that show a surprisingly close resemblance to humans.
Danuvius is a hominidae that walked on two legs, albeit not on the ground but in the trees. It was about one metre (3.2 feet) tall and weighed around 30 kilograms (66 pounds).
"What is similar to us humans is that he had a permanently stretched posture," explained University of Tuebingen Professor of Palaeoclimatology Madelaine Boehme, whose team discovered four skeletons between 2015 and 2018 in different clay pits.
Through scanning, mirroring and printing the fragments they found, the scientists were able to reconstruct how the homidaes may have looked like, as footage shot on Tuesday in Tuebingen shows. These findings could change the history of humans' evolutionary history.
"What surprised us all a lot, me included, was that these forms, these hominidaes, we call them 'Danuvius', have more similarities to humans in many skeletal parts than contemporary hominidaes have," Bohme stated.