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Don't watch your step anymore! Japanese robotic tail helps people correct balance

2 19.08.2019 Инфо

M/S Robotic tail "Arque" developed by researchers at Keio University, Tokyo *TRANSITION AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail moves in opposite direction as wearer tilts one way *MUSIC AT SOURCE*
C/U Robotic tail moving *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
C/U Robotic tail with sensors *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail moving *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail moves as wearer twists *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE* *TRANSITION AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail follows wearer's movements *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
C/U Robotic tail moving *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail attached to wearer's waist *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
C/U Robotic tail moving, artificial muscle graphic *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
C/U Artificial muscle *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
M/S Robotic tail moves as wearer moves in different directions *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
C/U Robotic tail moving *VOICEOVER AT SOURCE* *MUSIC AT SOURCE* *GRAPHICS AT SOURCE*
SCRIPT
A team of researchers from Tokyo's Keio University devised a robotic tail to help people who have troubles with keeping their balance and move with greater stability, as footage from Tokyo shows.
Researchers observed mammals and vertebrates whose tails are used as an additional limb, to develop this one metre (3 ft) long robotic device named Arque, which is attached to the wearer's waist and reminds of a seahorse's tail.
The prototype carries four artificial muscles and sensors which allow it to twist and swing in response to its human wearer, correcting the person's balance.
The first human robotic tail was showcased a couple of weeks ago, and despite being in a development phase, creators are investigating its potential in the medical field and also as a balance aid device for those working in physically challenging jobs.
MANDATORY CREDIT: Junichi Nabeshima, Kouta Minamizawa, MHD Yamen Saraiji
Keio University Graduate School of Media Design